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Osteoporosis

By Life Center | August 15, 2017 | 0 Comments

by Jonathan Landsman (NaturalNews) The numbers are staggering! Globally, osteoporosis causes more than 8.9 million fractures per year – resulting in a fracture every 3 seconds. Approximately 75 million people in Europe, USA and Japan are diagnosed with this preventable health crisis. The truth is osteoporosis is avoidable without drugs or expensive treatments by bringing the body chemistry back into balance. Is your body in pH balance? According to Nancy Appleton, Ph.D., “when the body is in homeostasis, the pH (acid/alkaline) balance is correct, the minerals are balanced with each other, the endocrine glands secrete the right amount of hormones into the bloodstream, and the body hums along.” “With an upset body chemistry, the pH becomes either too acidic or too alkaline, the mineral relationships become upset, and the endocrine glands secrete too much (or not enough) of their hormones.” Simply put, eat a diet rich in nutrients; avoid processed foods; don’t smoke; stay active and develop healthy relationships to enjoy healthy bones. Chronic stress can destroy your bones The endocrine system (located throughout the body) secretes hormones into the blood and helps regulate body chemistry. If you want to prevent bone loss – do NOT stress your adrenals, pancreas, thyroid, parathyroid, pituitary and gonads. Over time, the meals we eat and how we emotionally react to situations in our life – dramatically influence our physical health. There are many stressors that can deplete our body of minerals and increase our risk for osteoporosis plus many other degenerative diseases. The mineral balance of our body is affected by our emotional well-being, blood sugar levels, mental stress, physical pain plus much more. Do everything you can to minimize (chronic) stress from your life and watch how fast your body can heal itself.    Send article as PDF   

New technology at the center – HARMONIC EGG!

By Life Center | August 15, 2017 | 0 Comments

It is the next generation of sound and light therapy and it’s now available at Life Center. “I could feel immediately that this is VERY powerful.” ~Dr. Dana Anglund, D.O. “A massage of all the cells.” ~ Susan G. “It resonates the sound in it’s holographic-like micro-environment. Instead of hearing the sound from a speaker, you hear it in what I think is its natural broadcast.” ~Dominique Basically, you are not in a box anymore…it’s the shape of an egg and you are in a reclined position inside the egg while sound is playing and the light is set for the best session for your needs. Call today for an appointment to experience it for yourself.  303-630-9218    Send article as PDF   

Music and our deepest emotions…Autism today

By Life Center | August 15, 2017 | 0 Comments

Music has a universal ability to tap into our deepest emotions but for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), understanding emotions is a very difficult task. Individuals with ASD particularly have trouble recognizing social emotions like facial expressions – a frown, a smirk, or a smile. This inability can rob a child from being able to communicate and socialize, and often leads to social isolation. In a study led by Istvan Molnar-Szakacs, PhD, a researcher at the UCLA Tennenbaum Center for the Biology of Creativity and funded by the GRAMMY Foundation Grant Program, music will be used as a tool to explore the ability of children with ASD to identify emotions in musical excerpts and facial expressions. “Music has long been known to touch autistic children,” said Dr. Molnar-Szakacs. “Studies from the early days of autism research have already shown us that music provokes engagement and interest in kids with ASD. More recently, such things as musical memory and pitch abilities in children with ASD have been found to be as good as or better than in typically developing children.” Also, he said, researchers have shown that because many children with ASD are naturally interested in music, they respond well to music-based therapy. But no one has ever done a study to see if the brains of children with ASD process musical emotions and social emotions in the same way that typically developing children do. In this study, Dr. Molnar-Szakacs will use “emotional music” to engage the brain regions involved in emotion processing. “Our hypothesis is that if we are able to engage the brain region involved in emotion processing using emotional music, this will open the doorway for teaching children with ASD to better recognize emotions in social stimuli, such as facial expressions.” The overarching goal of the study, of course, is to gain insights about the causes of autism. Dr. Molnar-Szakacs will use neuroimaging functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fMRI to look at the brain activity of children with ASD, and compare them to the brains of typically developing kids, while both groups are engaged in identifying emotions from faces and musical excerpts. “The study should help us to better understand how the brain processes emotion in children with autism; that in turn will help us develop more optimal interventions. Importantly, this study will also help us promote the use of music as a powerful tool for studying brain functions from cognition to creativity.” Approximately 15 children with ASD ranging from 10 to 13 years of age will participate in this study, which is being conducted under the auspices of The Help Group – UCLA Autism Research Alliance. The Alliance, directed by Elizabeth Laugeson, is a partnership between The Help Group and the UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, and is dedicated to enhancing and expanding research in autism spectrum disorders. The project also is in collaboration with Katie Overy, Co-Director of the Institute for Music in Human and Social Development at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland. “The hope, of course, is that this work will not only be of scientific value and interest, but most of all, that it will translate into real-life improvements in the quality of the children’s lives,” said Dr. Molnar-Szakacs. __________________________________________________________ Autism Today is proud to be the first comprehensive online directory (established in 1998) of programs and services offering easy to locate professionals, schools, camps, recreational programs, and much more in one convenient place.    Send article as PDF   

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